University of Birmingham > Talks@bham > Physics and Astronomy Colloquia > “The Changing Face of School Physics and Maths Curriculum: What can we expect from Y1 Undergraduates on Entry to university degree courses?"

“The Changing Face of School Physics and Maths Curriculum: What can we expect from Y1 Undergraduates on Entry to university degree courses?"

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Prof Clive Speake.

The presentation will also feature a panel of five teachers. Tom Carpenter , James Coughlan , Martin Casey, Charles Trotter and Lynn Penny

The school curriculum in physics and mathematics seems to have been in a constant state of change over the past decade, and more changes may come along in the next few years. More and more of university applicants to Physics, Maths and Engineering courses are gaining top grades – in more and more subjects – and the commonly held view is that A Level exams are getting easier; students are entering, in particular, with less mathematical competence than was the case previously. Is this really the case? Do they have other, broader skills we are missing? Should university lecturers be working more closely with secondary school teachers to enable the transition between secondary and tertiary education to be smoother for students? This talk will explore what is currently on the menu and what a grade A or A* really means. A panel of teachers from a selection of different local schools and colleges (representatives from the newly formed, STEM sponsored, Teachers’ Advisory Group in Physics) will be on hand to answer questions, and discuss issues with lecturers. How prepared are A Level students for degree level study in 2012? How can we maximise their potential and meet their expectations?

This talk is part of the Physics and Astronomy Colloquia series.

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