University of Birmingham > Talks@bham > Astrophysics Seminars > Detecting circumbinary exoplanets with gravitational waves from the center-of-mass motion of LISA Galactic binaries

Detecting circumbinary exoplanets with gravitational waves from the center-of-mass motion of LISA Galactic binaries

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Silvia Toonen.

PhD meet & greet at 12.30

I will first review the effects of the center-of-mass motion on the observable gravitational waveform of long-lasting LISA binary sources, in particular stellar-mass black hole binaries and ultra-compact Galactic binaries. I will show that large peculiar accelerations will be generally observable by LISA and that induced Doppler modulations could reveal the presence of circumbinary third-bodies. Using these results I will then present the prospects for the detection of circumbinary exoplanets orbiting Galactic double white dwarf binaries with LISA . By employing simulated Galactic synthetic populations of white dwarf binaries and circumbinary planetary occurrence rates motivated by white dwarf pollution observations, I will provide the latest forecasts for LISA which suggest that up to few hundreds exoplanets with masses higher than Jupiter’s will be detected. I will furthermore highlight the remarkable advantage of gravitational wave observations, which will allow for the detection of circumbinary exoplanets everywhere within and possibly beyond the Milky Way, over electromagnetic searches, which are limited to observations in the Solar neighbourhood or toward the Galactic bulge. Finally I will outline the implications of these results for exoplanetary studies, and I will discuss the prospects of detecting more massive circumbinary objects with LISA , such as brown dwarfs and stars.

This talk is part of the Astrophysics Seminars series.

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