University of Birmingham > Talks@bham > Astrophysics Seminars > The supernova that made us rethink stellar evolution and binary stars: Supernova SN 1987A

The supernova that made us rethink stellar evolution and binary stars: Supernova SN 1987A

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Sean McGee.

It has been nearly 32 years since the discovery of the most-well observed supernova in history: SN 1987A , that exploded in the Large Magellanic cloud. It belonged to the most commonly occurring type of supernovae (a Type II event), but its peculiarity made us relook at the physics of stellar evolution and supernovae explosions. The progenitor identified for SN 1987A was not a red supergiant as expected from standard theory at the time, but a blue supergiant. The observational signatures of this blue supergiant indicate that it could have evolved from the merger of a massive binary system, providing evidence that such mergers do take place. We know from massive star surveys that nearly 30-40% of all interacting binaries are expected to merge. This talk will focus on the evolution of the progenitor of SN 1987A from a binary merger scenario, and present the first set of stellar evolution models that can simultaneously match the progenitor and the light curve of the supernova.

This talk is part of the Astrophysics Seminars series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

Talks@bham, University of Birmingham. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity.
talks@bham is based on talks.cam from the University of Cambridge.